5 Best provincial park campsites outside Halton

 

If you’ve found yourself feeling depressed every time you see a news update on your phone, you might feel like you need to get away and escape from the world for a few days.

The good news is you can now do that—provincial parks have permitted camping at some locations.

What better way to escaping all the doom and gloom on the news than getting out in the wilderness and enjoying nature?

These are the 5 best outdoor campgrounds outside Halton.


5: Kawartha Highlands

Located in Bancroft, Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park is just under a three-hour drive from Halton.

Currently, those who wish to camp in the backcountry areas of Kawartha Highlands must reserve a spot to receive a permit—which they must have on them at all times—for themselves and their vehicle. Campers must have either a physical or digital copy of their permit at all times while using the facilities (the vehicle permit should be displayed on the dash and visible through the windshield.).

Additionally, groups of campers are limited to five people or less, unless everyone is from the same household.

Kawartha Highlands is currently allowing fishing and boating in the many nearby lakes without restrictions, while visitors can also enjoy camping and hunting with some restrictions.

Photo courtesy of Ontario Parks’ website


4: Frontenac

Located in Sydenham, Frontenac Provincial Park is about a little more than a three-hour drive from Halton.

While they aren’t mandatory, reservations are strongly encouraged to ensure campers receive a spot, as space is limited. Upon arrival, campers must check-in to receive their camping permit, which they must keep on them at all times.

Additionally, groups of campers are limited to five people or less, unless everyone is from the same household.

Frontenac is currently allowing fishing and boating in the 22 nearby lakes, as well as hiking through more than 100 kilometres of looped trails without restrictions, as well as camping with some restrictions.

Photo courtesy of Ontario Parks’ website


3: The Massasauga

Located in Perry Sound, along the banks of Georgian Bay, The Massasauga Provincial Park is roughly a two-and-a-half-hour drive from Halton.

Currently, those who wish to camp in the backcountry areas of The Mississauga must reserve a spot to receive a permit, which they must keep with them—either as a physical or digital copy—at all times while using the facilities.

Additionally, groups of campers are limited to five people or less, unless everyone is from the same household.

The Massasauga is currently allowing boating and fishing in the many nearby lakes, which include Clear Lake and Spider Lake without restrictions, as well as hiking and hunting with some restrictions.

Photo courtesy of @aimedroofing's Instagram


2: Bon Echo

Located in Cloyne, Bon Echo Provincial Park, roughly a three-and-a-half-hour drive from Halton.

While they aren’t mandatory, reservations are strongly encouraged to ensure campers receive a spot, as space is limited. Upon arrival, campers must check-in to receive their camping permit, which they must keep on them at all times.

Additionally, groups of campers are limited to five people or less, unless everyone is from the same household.

Bon Echo is currently allowing boating and fishing in Mazinaw Lake—the seventh-deepest lake in Ontario—restriction free, as well as hunting, hiking, and camping with some restrictions.

Additionally, visitors can experience the 100-metre high Mazinaw Rock, which featuring more than 260 Indigenous pictographs.

Photo courtesy of Ontario Parks’ website


1: Algonquin

Located in Whitney, Algonquin Provincial Park is roughly a three-hour drive from Halton.

Currently, those who wish to camp in the backcountry areas of The Mississauga must reserve a spot to receive a permit, which they must keep with them—either as a physical or digital copy—at all times while using the facilities.

Additionally, groups of campers are limited to five people or less, unless everyone is from the same household.

Algonquin is currently allowing boating and fishing in the many nearby lakes without restrictions, as well as hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting, and camping with some restrictions.

Photo courtesy of Ontario Parks’ website

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