Here's What's in Store for the Laurier Milton Lecture Series

New year, new ideas.

Leading academics and staff from Wilfrid Laurier University (WLU) are presenting their thoughts at the Laurier Milton Lecture Series.

In partnership with the Town of Milton and Milton Public Library, lectures are taking place on the second Wednesday of each month until May (it began last October).

Admission is free.

Attendees are asked to register to stay up-to-date and receive reminders before lecture events.

For more information, contact the Milton Public Library at 905-875-2665.


Here’s what’s in store in early 2018:

Sharing Love through Community Music

Speaker: Brandon Leis, Community Music, Faculty of Music

Date: Feb. 14

Time: 7 p.m.

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main St. E. (MinMaxx Hall)

What is community music? Its origins are attributed to work in the UK, where the intervention of music amongst at-risk youth is a means to creating The origins of Community Music can be attributed to work in the United Kingdom, where the intervention of music amongst at-risk youth is a means to create positive change in their development. Presently, Community Music is used in a range of community contexts to promote positive social change. Both the undergraduate and Master’s degree programs in Community Music at Laurier are on the international forefront when it comes to this innovative field of study. Join Laurier Faculty member Brandon Leis and a panel of recent Laurier Community Music graduates and current students as they discuss the research they have done and the work they are currently doing as it relates to the newly established field of Community Music. The presentation will also include a Q&A with the panelists and an interactive musical workshop.



What Does It Mean to Indigenize Education?

Speaker: Erin Hodson, Indigenous Curriculum Specialist, Wilfrid Laurier University

Date: Mar. 14

Time: 7 p.m.

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main St. E. (MinMaxx Hall)

The relationship between Canada and its First Peoples is damaged. How do we begin to repair the damage of 500 years of Colonization? Wilfrid Laurier’s new Indigenous curriculum specialist, Erin Hodson, believes it is through education. Discover what it means to Indigenize education for an entire university.

In the summer of 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission released its Final Report and the 94 Calls to Action. I watched in awe as Senator Murray Sinclair read out all 94 Calls and wept. That was the moment that we as Indigenous people across Turtle Island had been waiting for. That moment was the first step on the long road to making things better, but it also opened up so much hurt in our collective hearts as we realized just how damaged the relationship between Canada and its First Peoples really was and still is. The question today remains; how do we fix it? How do we begin to repair the damage of 500 years of Colonization? My personal answer: through education. As Wilfrid Laurier’s new Indigenous Curriculum Specialist I have been asked many times what it means to Indigenize education and how I will do this for the entire University. First, it is not going to happen any time soon, and before anything else, we must get to know each other.”


The Myth Of The Age Of Entitlement: Millennials, Austerity, And Hope

Speaker: Dr. James Cairns, Social and Environmental Justice, Faculty of Liberal Arts

Date: Apr. 11

Time: 7 p.m.

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main St. E. (Mattamy Theatre)

Have you heard that we are living in the age of entitlement? Scholars and pundits declare that millennials expect special treatment, do whatever they feel like, and think they deserve to have things handed to them. This lecture will peel back the layers of the entitlement myth, expose its faults and redefine entitlement as a fundamental concept for realizing economic and environmental justice.


Just Trying to Fit in: The Importance of Friendship for Immigrant Youth in Canada

Speaker: Dr. Stacey Wilson-Forsberg, Department of Human Rights and Human Diversity, Faculty of Liberal Arts

Date: May 9

Time: 7 p.m.

Location: FirstOntario Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main St. E. (MinMaxx Hall)

The key to belonging is friendship. Making friends across ethnic groups during the adolescent years should be easy and natural, but it is not. Canadian research examining friendship and social interaction between immigrant and non-immigrant youth suggest that stories of acceptance are the exception rather than the norm. This lecture examines the central role that friendship plays in the lives of immigrant youth and the interactions between immigrant adolescents and their Canadian-born peers at school.  

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