What Do You Think About Adults Living With Their Parents in Halton?

Living with your parental unit is a reality for many young adults these days - especially in the expensive Greater Toronto Area - and can reap many benefits: laundry service, a fully-stocked fridge, ready-made meals, and free rent (or if you chip in, it’s ideally way below market value, depending on your family and/or financial circumstances).

But how many people - whether they’re married, single, engaged, between jobs, caring for aging Baby Boomers, running things at the office, or really not trying to be defined by society’s penchant for labels - are living with their nuclear families in Oakville, Burlington, Milton, and Halton Hills?

More and more of them, recently released Census 2016 numbers show.

A Statistics Canada analyst broke it down for us so we could explain the figures to you.

Let’s start with Oakville.

There were 29,125 adults in the 20-to-34-year-old range in Oakville in 2016 (that’s up 3.5 per cent from 2011 when there were 28,140 people — 15,710 of whom resided with their folks.).

Of them, 61.6 per cent - or 17,950 people - are believed to be living with their parents (or their parents are living with them. Either way, it’s a family affair). That marks a 14.3 per cent rise since 2011.

Overall, 3.9 per cent of households in town in 2016 were multigenerational — a number that’s also up 16.1 per cent since 2011.


Next up, Burlington.

Over in Burlington, there were 30,015 adults in the 20-to-34-year-old range in 2016 (up 0.3 per cent from 2011 when there were 29,940 people).

Of them, 48.2 per cent - or 14475 people - were believed to be living with their parents. The figure has risen 13.5 per cent since 2011.

Overall, 2.5 per cent of households in the city in 2016 were multigenerational — a number that’s also up 13.2 per cent since 2011.


Now onto Milton.

There were 19,280 adults in the 20-to-34-year-old range in 2016 (up 5.8 per cent from 2011 when there were 18,220 people).

Of them, 40.9 per cent were believed to be living with their parents. The figure has spiked 44.4 per cent since 2011.

Overall, 6.2 per cent of households in the city in 2016 were multigenerational — a number that’s also up 53.5 per cent since 2011.


Finally, Halton Hills.

There were 9,365 adults in the 20-to-34-year-old range in 2016 (up 8.3 per cent from 2011 when there were 8,650 people).

Of them, 56.5 cent were believed to be living with their parents. The figure has risen 25.9 per cent since 2011.

Overall, 4 per cent of households in Halton Hills in 2016 were multigenerational — a number that’s also up 19.7 per cent since 2011.

What do you think is driving this trend of adult children going back to mom and dad’s home?

What are your thoughts on adult children living with their parents?

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